Aftermath

Examines the current deportation system in the United States, the aftermath effects, and the political, social and legal issues.

Aftermath

Examines the current deportation system in the United States, the aftermath effects, and the political, social and legal issues.

More Books:

Aftermath
Language: en
Pages: 242
Authors: Dan Kanstroom
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2012-06-29 - Publisher: OUP USA

Examines the current deportation system in the United States, the aftermath effects, and the political, social and legal issues.
Aftermath
Language: en
Pages: 242
Authors: Daniel Kanstroom
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2014-01-01 - Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

Examines the current deportation system in the United States, the aftermath effects, and the political, social and legal issues.
Aftermath
Language: en
Pages: 259
Authors: Daniel Kanstroom
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: - Publisher:

Since 1996, when new, harsher deportation laws went into effect, the United States has deported millions of noncitizens back to their countries of origin. While the rights of immigrants-with or without legal status--as well as the appropriate pathway to legal status are the subject of much debate, hardly any attention
The New Deportations Delirium
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Daniel Kanstroom, M. Brinton Lykes
Categories: Law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-12-25 - Publisher: NYU Press

Since 1996, when the deportation laws were hardened, millions of migrants to the U.S., including many long-term legal permanent residents with “green cards,” have experienced summary arrest, incarceration without bail, transfer to remote detention facilities, and deportation without counsel—a life-time banishment from what is, in many cases, the only country
Constructing Illegality in America
Language: en
Pages: 412
Authors: Daniel Kanstroom, Cecilia Menjívar
Categories: Emigration and immigration law
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher:

"The topic of "illegal" immigration has been a major aspect of public discourse in the United States and many other immigrant-receiving countries. From the beginning of its modern invocation in the early twentieth century, the often ill-defined epithet of human "illegality" has figured prominently in the media; in vigorous public